Healthcare blogs – Hospice Of Howard County http://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 08:42:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Healthcare blogs – Hospice Of Howard County http://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/ 32 32 Voices on the Left: 5 leftist blogs to read this week https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/voices-on-the-left-5-leftist-blogs-to-read-this-week-3/ Mon, 16 May 2022 14:31:44 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/voices-on-the-left-5-leftist-blogs-to-read-this-week-3/ An overview of progressive news… 1.GB News appoints a president who has spent years promoting climate denial DeSmog features an article about how GB News appointed someone as chairman who has “a history of sharing stories that dismiss the threat of climate change, heightening concerns about the TV station’s role as a platform for opponents […]]]>

An overview of progressive news…

1.GB News appoints a president who has spent years promoting climate denial

DeSmog features an article about how GB News appointed someone as chairman who has “a history of sharing stories that dismiss the threat of climate change, heightening concerns about the TV station’s role as a platform for opponents of climate action”.

The site reports that “Between 2013 and 2017, UAE-based investment manager Alan McCormick tweeted numerous articles from climate science deniers, including one calling on readers to ‘celebrate carbon dioxide. “.

GB News has regularly hosted guests who have questioned climate science and oppose net zero policies, including the Net Zero Scrutiny Group (NZSG) of Conservative MPs. In March, presenter Nigel Farage called for a “net zero referendum” on UK climate targets, modeled on his Brexit campaign.

2. Taxpayers billed £17m to subsidize MPs’ food – openDemocracy

OpenDemocracy has an exclusive story of how taxpayers shelled out £17million to subsidize the House of Commons bars and restaurants over a three-year period.

He revealed that ‘politicians could have a full three-course restaurant meal for as little as £10.41 last year’.

This despite the House of Commons’ 17 bars and restaurants suffering huge financial losses – totaling £6.6million in the first year of the pandemic alone.

The findings come amid a skyrocketing cost of living crisis, with a Tory MP saying last week that food poverty was due to a lack of cooking and budgeting skills among the poor, for which he was widely blamed. sentenced.

Others, like Tory minister George Eustice, have urged people to stop buying branded items.

3. Labor can win by focusing on the cost of living, not the ‘culture war’, poll finds

LabourList has compiled a new Opinium poll which shows Labor can win the upcoming general election by focusing on the cost of living crisis and avoiding the ‘culture war’.

The poll, carried out for Progressive Britain, found that when people were asked which debate they were most passionate about at the moment, 46% answered the cost of living.

LabourList reports: “The cost of living came first, ahead of the NHS, the war in Ukraine and climate change. 6% said they were “passionate” about whether or not trans women should participate in women’s sport, and 6% cited the Recreational Drugs Act”.

Commenting after the research was published, Progressive Britain director Nathan Yeowell said: “The local election results match my experience on the doorstep: people are listening and ready to vote Labour.

“But we can’t rely on Johnson to keep messing up, we need to deliver a cost of living program that’s relevant to the current crisis and a vision for work, jobs and security that people can believe in for the next.” election. ”

4. The Conservative plan for stealth privatization of the NHS –Tribune Magazine

Christopher Thomas writes for Tribune Magazine about how the Conservative government is pushing ever-growing numbers of people into private alternatives by neglecting and underfunding the National Health Service.

A worrying survey last month found that half of private healthcare leaders expect their sector’s market in the UK to grow by 10-15% by 2025.

Christopher writes: “In a country where health care is universal, this in itself is a huge coup. Worse, it risks undermining the service support base we already have. The NHS is the envy of the world, but political choices made by a privileged few are turning a fundamentally unfair two-tier model of healthcare into Britain’s new normal.

He says chronic underfunding and lack of investment has led to record waiting lists, meaning more people have started turning to private health care.

“In the long term, declining use could form the basis for the end of the NHS as we know it,” he says.

5. Government plan to cut 90,000 civil service jobs marks a return to austerity, warns TUC-the morning star

The Morning Star features an article on the reaction to the government’s plan to cut 90,000 civil service jobs.

The Prime Minister has called for job cuts to free up money to spend on tax cuts, but the TUC once again claims its evidence the government is committed to austerity.

Frances O’Grady, General Secretary of the TUC, said: “This is the return to austerity – and we have seen how austerity has failed not just ordinary people but the country ultimately by curbing the growth.

“How on earth does the government expect to be able to get rid of 90,000 civil servants all at once and not harm communities, I really don’t know.

“Communities will be extremely angry if they seek to be impacted again, in terms of key public services.”

Basit Mahmood is editor of Left Foot Forward

As you are here, we have something to ask you. What we do here to deliver real news is more important than ever. But there’s a problem: we need readers like you to help us survive. We provide progressive and independent media that challenges the hateful rhetoric of the right. Together we can find the stories that get lost.

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14 Great Lung Cancer Blogs https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/14-great-lung-cancer-blogs/ Sun, 08 May 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/14-great-lung-cancer-blogs/ Lung cancer blogs are a window into the real world. For some people, documenting their story after a cancer diagnosis can be a wonderful release that helps them maintain a positive outlook while providing a source of support for others. In fact, a study of cancer patients who implemented expressive writing showed that exercise improved […]]]>

Lung cancer blogs are a window into the real world. For some people, documenting their story after a cancer diagnosis can be a wonderful release that helps them maintain a positive outlook while providing a source of support for others. In fact, a study of cancer patients who implemented expressive writing showed that exercise improved their quality of life.

For those who read the words of lung cancer survivors, the opportunity to peer into the daily life and struggles of someone living with their disease comforts them that they are not alone.

Here are some of the best lung cancer blogs written by patients, medical experts, and organizations.

Personal Lung Cancer Blogs

If you are looking for personal experiences, look for blogs written by people with lung cancer. You may find someone who is living with the same type of lung cancer as you or who is at a similar stage in their journey.

Gray connections

Janet Freeman-Daily, the blogger behind “Grey Connections: Perspectives on Lung Cancer, Brain Science, and Other Stuff,” was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer in 2011 — a surprise, as she writes that she had never smoked anything “except a salmon.” The lung cancer quickly became metastatic.

After participating in different treatments and trials, Janet has been in remission since 2013. She is a strong lung cancer advocate, speaking at conferences and events and writing about her experiences.

Every breath I take

“Every Breath I Take,” a blog by Lisa Goldman, chronicles her journey with non-small cell lung cancer. She was diagnosed in 2014 after months of being unable to get rid of a cough. She blogs and speaks to help raise awareness and educate about lung cancer.

Faith, family and friends

Lysa Buonanno’s “Faith, Family, & Friends” blog discusses life with stage 4 lung cancer. Diagnosed in 2011, Lysa is still battling her disease and writing about everything from cancer treatments to her family, going through dates with her husband and lectures about lung cancer survivors, all with a positive attitude.

EmBen Kicks Cancer

Emily Bennett Taylor of “EmBen Kicks Cancer” went from college athlete to stage 4 lung cancer patient at the age of 28. Diagnosed in 2012, her journey has not been easy, beginning with aggressive chemotherapy followed by complex surgery.

But as her story continues, it almost feels like a fairy tale. Her greatest hope in life was to be a mom. Knowing that cancer treatment would impact her fertility, Taylor and her husband saved embryos. In 2015, their surrogate mother gave birth to their twin girls.

As a busy mother, she has less time to write these days, but she still travels and shares her story to bring hope to others.

A Lil Lytnin’ hit lung cancer

Tori Tomalia was a stage 4 lung cancer patient, patient advocate, speaker, writer, and mother of three. Time is the charm”).

Tori’s blog “A Lil Lytnin’ Strikes Lung Cancer” is organized into five chronological chapters centered around travel, marriage, becoming a new mom, having twins, and her lung cancer diagnosis.

Life and Breath: Surviving Lung Cancer

Linnea Olson was an artist, writer and lung cancer advocate. In 2015, the divorced mother of three was diagnosed with stage 1B non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma subtype BAC).

Initially, her prognosis seemed very good and she underwent a lobectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy.

Linnea died of lung cancer in November 2021, so her blog is no longer active. However, message archives are still valuable to read.

“Life and Breath: Outliving Lung Cancer” takes you through Linnea’s journey as her cancer spreads, enters a clinical trial, and later recognizes that she will die from her disease. The trial she participated in kept her alive longer than she expected.

In “Summer: All Things Must End,” Linnea wrote about embracing your own mortality while actively engaging in the act of living. In his words: “After all, death is very much a part of life. You can’t have one without the other.

Her reflections also offer lighter notes – for example, she asks: what do cockroaches and cancer have in common?

Lung Cancer Organization Blogs

There are many lung cancer nonprofits and other organizations that raise awareness about lung cancer with blogs.

Lung Cancer Alliance

The Foundation for Lung Cancer blog covers a multitude of topics, including advocacy, community engagement, and research updates.

A mix of medical professionals, experts, advocates and patients have authored the articles published since 2014.

LUN Avoided

LUNGevity is focused on raising funds to support lung cancer research. With pages of blog posts dating back to 2010, you can find information on everything from lung cancer education to major medical conference updates.

There are many guest articles from experts and patients, as well as articles about volunteers and caregivers.

American Lung Cancer Foundation

The Lung Cancer Foundation of America blog covers a lot of ground but lets you search based on specific tags. For example, you can find articles on living with lung cancer, clinical trials, and advocacy. You can also sign up to receive the latest updates with their email newsletter.

Lung Cancer Initiative

The Lung Cancer Initiative, a North Carolina-based nonprofit, blogs on a range of topics, such as cancer nutrition and patient emergency funds. There are also featured articles for patient stories and honoring advocates.

The site also contains an archive of news and press releases, as well as an email newsletter that you can sign up for.

EVERY Breath

On the American Lung Association blog, you will find many informative articles about lung cancer, including research updates. You’ll also get great articles on the practical needs of living with lung cancer, such as tips on how to do spring cleaning safely.

The blogs, created by the editorial staff of the association, date back to 2015.

Lung Cancer Medical Blogs

If you’re looking for information about lung cancer research or want to hear from medical professionals who work with lung cancer patients, medical blogs are a great place to start.

Lung Cancer Research Foundation

If you like to keep up to date with the latest advances in medical research, the Lung Cancer Research Foundation news blog is a great resource. Posts cover findings from research studies, advocacy efforts and legal topics, as well as patient stories.

Many news articles are available in multiple languages, making it one of the most accessible lung cancer blogs on the web.

MD Anderson Cancer Center

One of the best ways to get accurate, actionable, up-to-date information about lung cancer is to visit cancer center websites. MD Anderson at the University of Texas offers a wealth of information on all types of cancer.

You can find articles based on the type of cancer you want to read. Some examples of MD Anderson’s articles on lung cancer include Menthol Cigarettes: The FDA’s Proposed Ban and Why They’re More Harmful and Nine Times Cancer Survivor: “I actually feel a little lucky. ”

Cancer.Net

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) operates cancer.net, which contains information about all types of cancer. Content on the lung cancer site is divided into non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer.

The Cancer.net blog covers all cancer-related topics. You can search for tags or view different categories of content, such as research, prevention, and content for caregivers. Some articles are accompanied by podcasts if you prefer to listen rather than read.

The lung cancer blog tag includes articles such as Living with stage 4 lung cancer: How genomic testing is helping me live longer and better and New treatments for non-small cell lung cancer with an EGFR mutation: What you need to know.

A word from Verywell

There are many great blogs written by lung cancer survivors, researchers, and advocates. It’s worth “reading around” to find a lung cancer blog that you really connect with.

Reading about the experiences of people living with lung cancer can help you feel a little less alone on your journey. Lung cancer blogs from trusted medical sources can also offer practical tips for coping and can help you find new treatment options.

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The show must go on: looking back | Blogs https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/the-show-must-go-on-looking-back-blogs/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 09:29:00 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/the-show-must-go-on-looking-back-blogs/ Taking the time to review your performance in the days that follow allows you to consider what went well and what didn’t, and how you can improve for future performance. These are often called retrospective reviews. Reviewing past performance is standard practice. Companies organize retrospectives after the closure of a project; healthcare providers chatting with […]]]>

Taking the time to review your performance in the days that follow allows you to consider what went well and what didn’t, and how you can improve for future performance. These are often called retrospective reviews.

Reviewing past performance is standard practice. Companies organize retrospectives after the closure of a project; healthcare providers chatting with teammates after completing medical procedures; and music institutes hold structured listening events (eg, Tape & Listen from the Heifetz Institute). Retrospective examinations are invaluable in uncovering habits, thoughts, and feelings that we may not notice at the time.

You’re probably already doing some of this: review your performance, speak with a teacher during a lesson, or get feedback from a knowledgeable listener who attended your event. You probably have some eavesdropping going on, so let’s structure these efforts to get the most out of them.

Begin

To ensure a successful exam, you will need to put a few things in place:

● Start your retrospective review within one week of the performance.

● Identify a quiet, distraction-free place to do your exam.

● Find a tracking system to take notes. Try this pattern.

● Choose headphones—ideally a pair that records a full range of frequencies.

● Adopt a neutral but productive mindset: I will listen to my performance from beginning to end, many times, to learn as much as possible and to celebrate my accomplishments.

● Reach out to a trusted fellow musician or mentor who may be able to provide feedback (allow time for this) in the coming days.

Before moving on to the actual retrospective review, pause for this caveat: it’s nearly impossible to know everything about a performance of a single listening. When we rewatch movies, we notice details we didn’t catch before. The same goes for reviews of our own performance. Each “listen” will call for different attention.

Listen 1: A supportive parent or other audience member

I recently attended a recital by a talented university violinist. After the concert, I found myself chatting with his mother, as we watched the post-performance greetings and the warm exchanges between his son and the audience members. She was beaming at the sight of her son connecting with listeners and enjoying his milestone, and she also offered generous but truthful observations about his performance. His favorable the tone was different from how most of us view our own performances. There’s a lesson to be learned here: when first listening to your performance, focus on the good. Support yourself as you would someone else.

All the musicians miss entries and sometimes play wrong notes, but in search of the shines-the good stuff – in your performance is really important. If you recorded your impressions right after the performance, review them. How do they maintain now that there was some time between execution and retrospective review? Try to deal with any negative thoughts or reactions that arise during this first pass. Take a quick note of every negative thought that pops up, but be sure to focus mostly on the positives and write them down.

Listen 2: Wide Blows

On your second listen, start examining your playing on different levels. At this higher level, take a in broad strokes (pardon the pun): general observations about your bow characteristics, offsets, intonation, tension, notes on the C string, connection with your collaborators and audience, etc. You search themes rather than details for each feature. Themes will tell you more about where you need to make changes to your workout routine (eg technical work).

During this listening cycle, you can replay parts of the recording to focus on a feature. For example, you might need to listen to the cadence three times to (1) witness the bow, (2) focus on the dynamics, and (3) listen without the video. Each of these tasks may deserve its own listening.

Listen 3: Nitty Gritty

In this listen, run through your performance with a fine-toothed comb. When you spot a problem, review those few seconds and think about what caused it and whether it was a one-time issue or if it happened at other times. As you go through every detail, know when and if your observations match your in broad strokes review of Listen 2. A detailed analysis leads you to determine how you can improve specific elements of a song and your interpretation of it, which gives an overview of your playing.

The more retrospectives you do, the easier it becomes and the more beneficial each one becomes

Listen 4: Translational

If someone, like your teacher, gave you feedback right after the performance or in a lesson since then, record their points on your tracking sheet as well. I call this phase translational because sometimes comments are too broad and indescribable, you may need to phrase them in an actionable way.

For example, what do you think of “Your last Brahms movement seemed outdated”? You may know what this means, but how will you correct it when you are in the practice room? Translate this comment now so you can act on it later. You might have an observation from your previous listening cycles (Listening 1-3) that anchors an unclear comment, such as obsolescence. If not, add it to your list of questions to ask your instructor in the next lesson.

Listening 5: With a friend or colleague

It’s time to listen with a trusted friend or colleague. Set up a time when you can review observations and watch parts of the performance together, either in person or on a video chat platform. There are many ways to approach this, but here are some considerations:

● Prioritize what you want to review (specific song or movement; a characteristic of your playing).

● Set the agenda and pace: start with the big picture and get down to business.

● Let your friend or colleague do the talking while you listen and ask questions. You already have a hard copy of what you heard, saw, thought and felt. It’s also easy to agree with someone else’s analysis of our game, even when we disagree. But your job here is to record that person’s unfiltered observations, without influencing them in any way. Ask questions to get very clear on what they mean. Only then should you share your impressions.

● On your tracking sheet, note how their observations match or differ from yours.

● Show your appreciation for the time they spent with you. Buy them a coffee and make it clear that you would be honored to return the favor.

Listening 6: deferred listening

Come back to the show in a few weeks, a month or a year. Listen with fresh eyes and review your retrospective comments. Over time, we learn more about what we couldn’t hear or see at the time.

Summarize your findings

After Listen 6, you’ve accomplished a lot: zooming in and then rewinding your performance to find lessons learned. Write down every last observation (thought, feeling) in your tracking sheet. Leave nothing in memory. Create a takeaway list and record your thoughts on this exercise as well: What worked and what could improve this process in the future?

The more retrospectives you do, the easier it becomes and the more beneficial each one becomes. So keep going, even when they feel uncomfortable. Like every element of your playing, this one is essential to your growth as a master musician and performer.

Adam Hockman is a practice and performance consultant on the faculty of the Heifetz International Institute of Music. He applies his training in behavioral and learning sciences to the practice, performance and teaching of music. Learn more at adamhockman.com.

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MENTAL HEALTH ARCHITECTURE – AIA NY ARCHITECTURE CENTER | Blogs https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/mental-health-architecture-aia-ny-architecture-center-blogs/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 01:57:00 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/mental-health-architecture-aia-ny-architecture-center-blogs/ AIA Design for Health Session | Tuesday, May 3, 2022 (6-7 p.m. EST) Credits: 1 AIA/HSW Insight: This educational session will provide an overview of the history (past), current direction and challenges (present) related to creating safety and security. Additionally, this session will share principles and examples for visioning the future of behavioral health design. […]]]>

AIA Design for Health Session | Tuesday, May 3, 2022 (6-7 p.m. EST) Credits: 1 AIA/HSW

Insight:

This educational session will provide an overview of the history (past), current direction and challenges (present) related to creating safety and security. Additionally, this session will share principles and examples for visioning the future of behavioral health design. Speakers Erin Sharp-Newton of Posen Architects and Kimberly McMurray of BHFC Design Consultants have extensive experience in this market segment and have developed a presentation to educate attendees on this relevant topic, including the COVID pandemic and how architecture and design address behavioral health needs within our communities.

Participants in this session will discover:

  1. THE STORY: A Brief Architectural History of Psychiatric and Mental Health Institutions.
  2. PRESENT: Current data regarding mental health information, facts and figures.
  3. SAFETY + SECURITY: Guidelines for creating a safe environment for patient and staff through the integration of safety into the design process.
  4. PRINCIPLES + VISION: Create design principles for therapeutic environments and understand the changes on the horizon that impact the built environment for behavioral and mental health settings.
SPEAKERS

SPEAKER: Erin Sharp-Newton, M. Arch, Fitwel
Healthcare Design Director | Behavioral Health Leader | POSEN Architects Erin Sharp-Newton is Director of Healthcare Design at Posen Architects and a UDMH Fellow. Erin brings years of proven local, national and international design experience to the design world with a particular passion for the impact of the environment on mental health. His unique experience and advocacy contribute to a sharp, intense and humanistic approach to architecture, design and culture.

Supporting the Global Solutions Foundation, Erin also serves the Department of Health and Human Services as Chair of the Local Drug and Alcohol Advisory Committee, serves the AIA NJ Equity In Architecture Committee, is the AIA NJ Women in Architecture CNJ Liaison, a trustee for the AIA CNJ, served as Vice Chair of the Hunterdon Drug Awareness Program Board and a member of the Morristown Mayor’s Wellness Committee. She has received accolades throughout her career such as the NJ Biz 50 Best Women in Business Award and recognition from Charter High School of Architecture and Design. Erin holds a Masters in Architecture from UCLA and a Masters in Design from Domus Academy in Milan, Italy. She was creative director at Cibic Workshop in Milan, was active in major architecture/design schools such as Domus Academy, Milan Polytecnico and Venice Polytecnico, Sci-Arc, UCLA, Woodbury, the Art Institute, Drexel , Moore College of Art, Cornell University and others. She is a regular contributor to Archinect.com.

SPEAKER: Kimberly McMurray, AIA, EDAC, MBA, NCARB
Behavioral Health Facility Consulting, LLC | Kimberly McMurray, principal of Behavioral Health Facility Consulting, LLC, a 100% women-owned company, is a behavioral health design expert, is a practicing health care planner and architect with over 35 years of experience. healthcare leadership experience in academic, non-profit, and private medical campus architecture. McMurray has a decade of experience from an owner’s perspective and working with multidisciplinary user groups, embracing a unique perspective and response to customer needs; apply knowledge of clinical operations, evidence-based design, lean operational planning; to lead projects from programming, concept development to design.

Kimberly is a Registered Architect, National Council Architectural Registration Boards, has her evidence-based design certification from the Center for Health Design. She holds a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Arizona State University and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

MODERATOR: Elizabeth Sullivan, AIA Associate, LEED GA, EDAC Healthcare Practice Leader | NK Architects

Elizabeth Sullivan is the Healthcare Practice Leader at NK Architects in New York City, headquartered in Morristown NJ. Elizabeth has extensive experience in management and medical planning. As a healthcare planner, she specializes in general medical planning, small and large scale facilities and complex multi-phase projects. She manages and coordinates with management, balancing key stakeholder and user requirements with applicable codes and guidelines to achieve design solutions that meet programmatic needs and result in cohesive planning concepts.

Additionally, Elizabeth worked as both a project manager and later as the director of facilities and real estate planning for the Montefiore Health System in New York. She has unique in-house experience as a client and understands the entire project process from the owner’s perspective. Elizabeth is AIA Co-Chair of the Design for Health Committee of the Center for Architecture in New York and was Associate Director at Perkins Eastman. Elizabeth holds an M.A. and B.A. in Architecture from Tulane University. She is the Evidence-Based Design Accreditation (EDAC) certification from the Center for Health Design.

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Opinion: Importance of mental health awareness in school https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/opinion-importance-of-mental-health-awareness-in-school/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 11:54:54 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/opinion-importance-of-mental-health-awareness-in-school/ New Delhi: Children spend most of their time in school and this is where the maximum development takes place. Ensuring an atmosphere of safety and comfort is a must, as well as mental health awareness. Mental health is not just the absence of mental illness, it includes a state of well-being where a person can […]]]>

New Delhi: Children spend most of their time in school and this is where the maximum development takes place. Ensuring an atmosphere of safety and comfort is a must, as well as mental health awareness. Mental health is not just the absence of mental illness, it includes a state of well-being where a person can reach learning potential, cope with normal stress, and be connected to the community of friends.

In most cases, mental illness begins to show early signs around age 15 to 17, but the majority of people seek help in adulthood. If schools become actively involved in mental health, we can slow the progression of mental illness through early intervention. To ensure effective delivery of mental health care to children, a multidisciplinary team is needed, which would include school leaders, teachers, staff, parents and school counsellors.

Read also : All about government health care programs that aim for health for all

The goal of school involvement is to look for early signs and symptoms of mental illness and to seek professional help if needed. In addition, schools help promote the healthy social and emotional development of children. Resilience building, which is the ability to cope with negative events and adversities, is also enhanced by schools where mental health and well-being are central concerns.

Schools should teach students about mental health more actively with an emphasis on identifying their emotions and an open door policy where children are listened to if they approach a member of staff. There should be an identified safe space in the school where children can go and perhaps talk to a school counselor or student volunteer. Teachers should also receive mental health training, so they know when to escalate problems and refer students to professional help. Even parents need to be trained to handle their children if they experience emotional turmoil.

Strict anti-bullying policies must be in place to ensure a comfortable environment for children. Children need to be educated about mental health as it is still a taboo subject and raising children’s awareness about their mental well-being by organizing some workshops will help them understand the subject better.

Read also : Budget 2022: Mental health and the national digital health ecosystem attract attention, but only 0.23% increase in health spending

Students should also be emphatic about physical health and the connection between physical and mental health. Emphasis should be placed on exercises to stay physically fit to ensure mental well-being. Introducing mindfulness training to adolescents can help them cope with stressors and make them more resilient. Yoga and breathing exercises are helpful as they help increase students’ focus and confidence. A confident child is more self-aware and able to handle situations better.

Promote positive self-esteem by supporting good decision-making, assertiveness and

Schools, especially these days when they reopened after covid, where only online learning was taking place, should focus on social interactions. Students should be encouraged to talk to their peers during breaks. There should be various academic and non-academic clubs that children should participate in.

The need to form a sense of community is a must where all students should be encouraged to discuss the uniqueness of each classmate, teacher and staff member. They need to be made aware

that all these people are together, and that they form a community together. They should be encouraged to do community building activities by highlighting each other’s activities.

School-based mental health programs are the need of the hour, especially as new and unique issues increase every day. Teachers who interact the most with students should identify any changes in the child’s behavior early on, such as the child not interacting with other children in the class, seeming very distracted, fighting easily, not following not take orders or was very sleepy. and tired, the teacher should immediately take note. The teacher should encourage talking to the child concerned and, if necessary, report the problem to the school authorities so that interventions can be started immediately and we can prevent any further deterioration. Self-harm and suicides among teenagers are the most alarming problems. In fact, death by suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-25 year olds. Raising awareness can save lives.

Mental health problems are increasing every day, especially among children and adolescents, and it is the responsibility of the school to ensure early detection and provide help, to ensure a better and healthy future for our country.

Read also : Expert Blog: The Future of Healthcare IT: New Innovations and Trends

(Dr. Priyanka Mahajan Thukral is the Consultant Psychiatrist at Masina Hospital)

Disclaimer: These are the personal opinions of the author.

NDTV – Dettol has been working for a clean and healthy India since 2014 through the Banega Swachh India initiative, which is led by campaign ambassador Amitabh Bachchan. The campaign aims to highlight the interconnectedness of humans and the environment, and of humans to each other, with a focus on One Health, One Planet, One Future – Leaving No One Behind. It emphasizes the need to care for and consider the health of everyone in India – especially vulnerable communities – the LGBTQ population, indigenous peoples, various Indian tribes, ethnic and linguistic minorities, people with disabilities, migrants, geographically distant populations, gender and sexual minorities. As a result of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the need for WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) is reaffirmed as hand washing is one of the ways to prevent coronavirus infection and other diseases. The campaign will continue to raise awareness on the same topic while focusing on the importance of nutrition and health care for women and children, the fight against malnutrition, mental well-being, self-care, science and health, adolescent health and gender awareness. Along with the health of people, the campaign realized the need to also take care of the health of the ecosystem. Our environment is fragile due to human activity, which not only overexploits available resources, but also generates immense pollution due to the use and extraction of these resources. The imbalance has also resulted in an immense loss of biodiversity which has caused one of the greatest threats to human survival – climate change. It has now been described as a “code red for humanity”. The campaign will continue to cover issues such as air pollution, waste management, plastic bans, manual garbage collectors and sanitation workers and menstrual hygiene. Banega Swasth India will also pursue the dream of Swasth Bharat, the campaign believes that only a clean Swachh or India where toilets are used and Open Defecation (ODF) status achieved under the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2014, can eradicate diseases like Diahorrea and the country can become a Swasth or a healthy India.

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FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM | Blogs | Archinect https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/fotofocus-symposium-blogs-archinect/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 20:48:23 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/fotofocus-symposium-blogs-archinect/ FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM (4.9.22-4.10.22) “The FotoFocus Symposium returns for its sixth edition this spring, centered on the theme of telephotography and held in two locations. World-renowned speakers from the fields of architecture, art, fashion, film, of psychology and media will speculate on the past, present and future of long-distance image sharing – both physically and digitally, […]]]>

FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM (4.9.22-4.10.22)

“The FotoFocus Symposium returns for its sixth edition this spring, centered on the theme of telephotography and held in two locations. World-renowned speakers from the fields of architecture, art, fashion, film, of psychology and media will speculate on the past, present and future of long-distance image sharing – both physically and digitally, literally and figuratively – in a series of panel discussions, lectures and screenings of movies.

ABOUT THE THEME: TELEPHOTOGRAPHY

From the earliest transmissions of photographs to today’s ubiquitous online information sharing, telephotography has become so central to contemporary life that it is hard to imagine communications without it. The FotoFocus symposium will explore both the electronic circulation of photographs and the technique of photographing distant objects. Whether through personal photographs, press footage or military surveillance, Telephotography will explore our desire for closeness and the ways in which we approach things through photographs.

Panels and presentations will address 19th century scientific photography’s attempts to capture the invisible; first press photography and wireframe photo services; artists making exhibitions in remote locations designed to be experienced through transmitted images; the ways filmmakers use their medium to tell private and public stories; the impact of telephotography on office architecture and design; artists whose work focuses on disconnection/connection; and fierce competition among photojournalists to provide breaking news on conflict sites.

Participating artists include renowned visual artist and fashion photographer Collier Schorr, the Symposium’s keynote speaker, who has exhibited internationally and produced covers and editorials for Vogue and the New York Times; famed photographer Moyra Davey, known for her series of photographs by mail in which she folds her photographs into envelopes and sends them to friends; visual artist and environmental activist Mary Mattingly, who often places her climate change installations in inaccessible waters; and Kevin Schmidt, the artist who transformed a lonely, abandoned house into an art installation virtually impossible to visit in person but widely shared on social media.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The first day of programming, Saturday, April 9, held at Memorial Hall, will cover a wide range of topics, such as how 19th-century scientists attempted to capture electricity on film; the meteoric rise of press photography between the 1930s and the 1970s; how architectural renderings and visualizations have changed in recent years; and the complex role of being a photojournalist in today’s world of fast-paced news cycles.

The second day of the symposium, Sunday April 10, will be a film program held at the Garfield Theater, with several short films and a screening of the film The main actor [The Leading Actor]. The day includes a panel discussion showcasing the diversity of Latin American cultures to North American audiences, while examining how media, especially photographic imagery, create and distort understandings of foreign cultures.

HIGHLIGHT: ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN + PHOTOGRAPHY
DESIGNING FOR PEOPLE?

For decades, architects and designers have largely preferred to depict their designs of buildings and cities as sparsely populated as possible in order to showcase those designs. Today, visualizations of future spaces and their documentation once built have begun to include people, but as an element subordinate to designs. This panel explores how photography and visualizations can help us better understand how we are actually impacted by the architectural spaces we inhabit.

Curated by Kevin Moore, Artistic Director of FotoFocus. Moderated by David van der Leer, Principal, DVDL, with panelists: Todd Levon Brown, Environmental Psychologist; Iwan Baan, photographer; and Erin Sharp Newton, design director for healthcare practice at Posen Architects.

The symposium and film program are free and open to the public.
Full symposium schedule and Symposium attendees.

SOURCE + NOTE + CREDIT:
The selected text above is from the fotofocus.org website:
FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM 2022, fotofocus.org/symposium/2022/

#FotoFocus#FFsymposium#telephotography

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FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM – DESIGNING FOR PEOPLE | Blogs https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/fotofocus-symposium-designing-for-people-blogs/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/fotofocus-symposium-designing-for-people-blogs/ FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM (4.9.22-4.10.22) “The FotoFocus Symposium returns for its sixth edition this spring, centered on the theme of telephotography and held in two locations. World-renowned speakers from the fields of architecture, art, fashion, film, of psychology and media will speculate on the past, present and future of long-distance image sharing – both physically and digitally, […]]]>

FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM (4.9.22-4.10.22)

“The FotoFocus Symposium returns for its sixth edition this spring, centered on the theme of telephotography and held in two locations. World-renowned speakers from the fields of architecture, art, fashion, film, of psychology and media will speculate on the past, present and future of long-distance image sharing – both physically and digitally, literally and figuratively – in a series of panel discussions, lectures and screenings of movies.

ABOUT THE THEME: TELEPHOTOGRAPHY

From the earliest transmissions of photographs to today’s ubiquitous online information sharing, telephotography has become so central to contemporary life that it is hard to imagine communications without it. The FotoFocus symposium will explore both the electronic circulation of photographs and the technique of photographing distant objects. Whether through personal photographs, press footage or military surveillance, Telephotography will explore our desire for closeness and the ways in which we approach things through photographs.

Panels and presentations will address 19th century scientific photography’s attempts to capture the invisible; first press photography and wireframe photo services; artists making exhibitions in remote locations designed to be experienced through transmitted images; the ways filmmakers use their medium to tell private and public stories; the impact of telephotography on office architecture and design; artists whose work focuses on disconnection/connection; and fierce competition among photojournalists to deliver breaking news to conflict sites.

Participating artists include renowned visual artist and fashion photographer Collier Schorr, the Symposium’s keynote speaker, who has exhibited internationally and produced covers and editorials for Vogue and the New York Times; famed photographer Moyra Davey, known for her series of mailed photographs in which she folds her photographs into envelopes and sends them to friends; visual artist and environmental activist Mary Mattingly, who often places her climate change installations in inaccessible waters; and Kevin Schmidt, the artist who transformed a lonely, abandoned house into an art installation virtually impossible to visit in person but widely shared on social media.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The first day of programming, Saturday, April 9, held at Memorial Hall, will cover a wide range of topics, such as how 19th-century scientists attempted to capture electricity on film; the meteoric rise of press photography between the 1930s and the 1970s; how architectural renderings and visualizations have changed in recent years; and the complex role of being a photojournalist in today’s world of fast-paced news cycles.

The second day of the symposium, Sunday April 10, will be a film program held at the Garfield Theater, with several short films and a screening of the film The main actor [The Leading Actor]. The day includes a panel discussion showcasing the diversity of Latin American cultures to North American audiences, while examining how media, especially photographic imagery, create and distort understandings of foreign cultures.

HIGHLIGHT: ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN + PHOTOGRAPHY
DESIGNING FOR PEOPLE?

For decades, architects and designers have largely preferred to depict their designs of buildings and cities as sparsely populated as possible in order to showcase those designs. Today, visualizations of future spaces and their documentation once built have begun to include people, but as an element subordinate to designs. This panel explores how photography and visualizations can help us better understand how we are actually impacted by the architectural spaces we inhabit.

Curated by Kevin Moore, Artistic Director of FotoFocus. Moderated by David van der Leer, Principal, DVDL, with panelists: Todd Levon Brown, Environmental Psychologist; Iwan Baan, photographer; and Erin Sharp Newton, design director for healthcare practice at Posen Architects.

The symposium and film program are free and open to the public.
Full symposium schedule and Symposium attendees.

SOURCE + NOTE + CREDIT:
The selected text above is from the fotofocus.org website:
FOTOFOCUS SYMPOSIUM 2022, fotofocus.org/symposium/2022/

#FotoFocus#FFsymposium#telephotography

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The March Edition: The Latest Update from Balfour Beatty’s Zero Carbon Build Site – Blogs – Media https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/the-march-edition-the-latest-update-from-balfour-beattys-zero-carbon-build-site-blogs-media/ Thu, 31 Mar 2022 09:05:41 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/the-march-edition-the-latest-update-from-balfour-beattys-zero-carbon-build-site-blogs-media/ Angela Pllu, Head of Environment and Sustainability, reflects on the progress Balfour Beatty has made behind the scenes over the past few months at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh. It’s been a few months since we last reported on our journey to the zero carbon building site of the future in our Edinburgh Biomes […]]]>

Angela Pllu, Head of Environment and Sustainability, reflects on the progress Balfour Beatty has made behind the scenes over the past few months at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh.

It’s been a few months since we last reported on our journey to the zero carbon building site of the future in our Edinburgh Biomes – Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh project.

As the advanced works are coming to an end, we currently have a limited presence on site. But fear not, that hasn’t slowed us down and we’ve continued to work behind the scenes to address some of the thorny issues we face in reducing our on-site carbon emissions.

One of the things we’ve been tackling is the financial costs associated with zero-carbon construction. Generally, we’ve found the upfront costs of low carbon options to be considerably higher than more traditional methods – but of course the costs can be recouped over the longer term through energy efficiency.

We are taking this opportunity to test as many low carbon options as possible, at no additional cost to the customer, by working with third parties and our supply chain partners such as Sunbelt Rentals. They’ve stepped up and subsidized the cost of eco-cabins on site, allowing us to collect the best data on their performance and show the benefits these cabins can actually deliver.

Through these trials, we will understand what works and what doesn’t, both in terms of carbon reduction and cost effectiveness, and once we understand, we can implement these solutions on other projects in our portfolio.

Elsewhere, topsoil was at the “top” of our list.

Although we are always looking to reuse topsoil as it is a nutrient rich, fertile, valuable and finite resource taking around 100 years to manufacture, on a project of this scale we had a substantial amount of spare! We offered the land to individuals and local organizations and were delighted to be inundated with requests from the community.

Made possible by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) agreeing that we could use the ‘Greenfield Soil Protocol’, we delivered some 50 tonnes to the local area. A significant step forward to ensure that this precious resource is classified as a material that can be reused and that its intrinsic value is not lost.

And finally, as I look back on one of the main goals of this experience, I am also delighted to report that we have made significant progress in the development of our employees as well as our supply chain partners.

Across the UK, we have a mandatory Carbon Conscious education program in place, so that all of our employees understand the carbon costs of their behavior and how they can play their part in helping Balfour Beatty reduce its carbon footprint.

We have also started working with our partners to ensure that qualifications and training frameworks reflect the importance of carbon-related knowledge and skills, helping to increase the level of understanding of climate change and how their skills contribute to net zero. One of the key elements we looked at is ensuring that sustainability is included in all learning programs.

We still have a long way to go, but we are happy with how far we have come. It hasn’t been easy, but personally, I’m grateful to work for a company that takes its environmental responsibility so seriously and is willing to work for the benefit of the entire industry.

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Dynamo Dash Youth Trials | Woodlands Online Blogs https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/dynamo-dash-youth-trials-woodlands-online-blogs/ Mon, 28 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/dynamo-dash-youth-trials-woodlands-online-blogs/ The tryouts are for boys and girls ages 11 through 18-19 who want to join the Houston Dynamo Dash Youth Soccer Club. All U10 players are invited to be evaluated for a competitive U11 team or for the U10 Youth Academy. the Competitive program offers young athletes (born from 2012 to 2004) the possibility of […]]]>

The tryouts are for boys and girls ages 11 through 18-19 who want to join the Houston Dynamo Dash Youth Soccer Club. All U10 players are invited to be evaluated for a competitive U11 team or for the U10 Youth Academy.

the Competitive program offers young athletes (born from 2012 to 2004) the possibility of playing against local, regional and national opponents with teams formed by level of ability.

The competitive program prepares players for this level of opposition in the following way.

  • Education skillful, possession and attacking football
  • The players are developed through a proven curriculum recognized for developing excellence
  • Players are continually pushed in training and in matches. For our club, we want push players to the next level

Each competitive team is led by a licensed head coach who is responsible for the full cycle of player development. Plan, execute and evaluate. The head coach is supported by a director of coaching. The term ‘trainer’ does not exist in our organization. Parents only provide administrative support.

To learn more about our Youth Academy boys and girls programming, please click here.

To learn more about our Elite Boys & Girls programming, please click here.

dynamodashyouth.com/tryouts

The dates for the trials in the woods are:

  • May 9 to 11
  • May 16 to 18



















The Woodlands U11 – U13 Trials
U10 – U13 Girls
age range Appointment Weather Location Born players
U10 Girls May 9 – 11 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. gosling park 2 January 1, 2013 – December 31, 2013
Girls U11 May 9 – 11 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. gosling park 2 January 1, 2012 – December 31, 2012
U12 Girls May 9 – 11 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. gosling park 3 January 1, 2011 – December 31, 2011
Girls U13 May 9 – 11 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. gosling park 2 January 1, 2010 – December 31, 2010
Trials will be held at Gosling Sports Fields – 4055 Marisco Place, The Woodlands, TX 77384
U10 – U13 Boys
age range Appointment Weather Location Born players
U10 Boys May 9 – 11 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bear branch 5 January 1, 2013 – December 31, 2013
U11 Boys May 9 – 11 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bear branch 5 January 1, 2012 – December 31, 2012
U12 Boys May 9 – 11 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bear branch 3 January 1, 2011 – December 31, 2011
U13 Boys May 9 – 11 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Bear branch 3 January 1, 2010 – December 31, 2010
Trials will be held at Bear Branch Sports Fields – 5205 Research Forest Dr, The Woodlands, TX 77381























The Woodlands U14 – Trials U18/19
U14 – U19 Girls
age range Appointment Weather Location Born players
Girls U14 May 16 – 18 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. gosling park 2 January 1, 2009 – December 31, 2009
U15 Girls May 16 – 18 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. gosling park 3 January 1, 2008 – December 31, 2008
Girls U16 May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. gosling park 3 January 1, 2007 – December 31, 2007
U17 Girls May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. gosling park 2 January 1, 2006 – December 31, 2006
Girls U18 May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. gosling park 1 January 1, 2005 – December 31, 2005
U19 Girls May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. gosling park 1 January 1, 2004 – December 31, 2004
Trials will be held at Gosling Sports Fields – 4055 Marisco Place, The Woodlands, TX 77384
U14 – U19 Boys
age range Appointment Weather Born players
U14 Boys May 16 – 18 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Bear branch 3 January 1, 2009 – December 31, 2009
U15 Boys May 16 – 18 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Bear branch 5 January 1, 2008 – December 31, 2008
U16 Boys May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bear branch 5 January 1, 2007 – December 31, 2007
U17 Boys May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bear branch 3 January 1, 2006 – December 31, 2006
U18 Boys May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bear branch 1 January 1, 2005 – December 31, 2005
U19 Boys May 16 – 18 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bear branch 1 January 1, 2004 – December 31, 2004
Trials will be held at Bear Branch Sports Fields – 5205 Research Forest Dr, The Woodlands, TX 77381

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Thursday GFN: new SteelSeries Stratus+ controller https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/thursday-gfn-new-steelseries-stratus-controller/ Thu, 24 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://hospiceofhowardcounty.com/thursday-gfn-new-steelseries-stratus-controller/ GeForce NOW gives you the power to game almost anywhere, with GeForce quality. And with SteelSeries’ latest controller, members can stay in control of the action on Android and Chromebook devices. This Thursday GFN takes a look at the SteelSeries Stratus+, which is now part of the GeForce NOW Recommended program. And it wouldn’t be […]]]>

GeForce NOW gives you the power to game almost anywhere, with GeForce quality. And with SteelSeries’ latest controller, members can stay in control of the action on Android and Chromebook devices.

This Thursday GFN takes a look at the SteelSeries Stratus+, which is now part of the GeForce NOW Recommended program.

And it wouldn’t be Thursday without new games, so get ready for six additions to the GeForce NOW library, including the latest season of fortnite and a special in-game event for maple story it’s exclusive for GeForce NOW members.

The power to play, in the palm of your hand

GeForce NOW turns cell phones into powerful gaming PCs capable of streaming PC games anywhere. The best mobile gaming sessions are supported by recommended controllers, including the new Stratus+ from SteelSeries.

Take control of the way you play with the new SteelSeries Stratus+.

The Stratus+ Wireless Controller combines precision and comfort, delivering a full console experience on a mobile phone and giving Android and Chromebook gamers a competitive edge. Gamers can simply connect to any Android or Chromebook mobile device with Bluetooth Low Energy and play with a rechargeable battery that lasts up to 90 hours. Or they can connect to any Windows PC via a USB connection.

The controller works great with GeForce NOW’s RTX 3080 subscription. Playing on select 120Hz Android phones, members can stream their favorite PC games at up to 120 frames per second.

The SteelSeries line of controllers are part of GeForce NOW’s full line of recommended products, including optimized routers that are perfect home networking upgrades.

Launch your game

This week marks the start of fortnite Chapter 3 Season 2, “Resistance”. The building was destroyed. To help maintain cover, you now have an overshield and new tactics like sprinting, mantling and more. Even board an armored battle bus to be a mighty force or attach a cow catcher to your vehicle for extra punching power. Join the Seven in the final battle against the IOs to free the Zero Point. Don’t forget to grab the Chapter 3 Season 2 Battle Pass to unlock characters like Tsuki 2.0, familiar enemy Gunnar, and The Origin.

MapleStory on GeForce NOW
Adventure and rewards await you in this exclusive GeForce NOW quest.

Nexon, maker of popular global MMORPGs maple story, launches a special in-game quest, exclusive to GeForce NOW members. Level 30+ Maplers who log in using GeForce NOW will receive a GeForce NOW Quest which grants players a Lil Boo Pet and a GeForce NOW Event Box which can be opened 24 hours after acquisition. But hurry, this quest is only available from March 24 to April 28.

And since GFN Thursday means more games every week. This week features an open, zombie-infested sandbox Zomboid Project. Play alone or survive with friends thanks to multiplayer support on persistent servers.

Zomboid project on GeForce NOW
Finally, a game that proves you can learn valuable skills from watching TV. Won’t your mother be proud?

Are you feeling zombie shy? That’s okay, there’s always something new to play on GeForce NOW. Here’s the full list of the six titles coming this week:

Finally, the release schedule of Lumote: The Mastermote Chronicles has changed and will join GeForce NOW at a later date.

With the cloud providing new ways to play PC games on your devices, we have a question that might make you a little nostalgic this GFN Thursday. Let us know your answer on Twitter:

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